Strangers No More: BYU Magazine Article on Refugees in Germany

My alma mater, Brigham Young University, solicited a piece from me for their alumni magazine in which I was to describe the nature of volunteer refugee work in central Germany. I suggested to them this piece, from right here on the blog, and they agreed.

When BYU Magazine agrees, brace. They hold nothing back.

They turned my homey post into a visually striking work of top notch journalism. I could not be more pleased. Thank you so much Peter Gardner and Curtis Isaak, for your excellent editing and lay out.

Please click right here to find their finished product.

What pleases me the most about this, is that there is interest for such a piece, and although the typical nano-length of the news cycle is over, the interest in the story (which  is really just starting) seems to be increasing. People are looking to get behind the thick, gray wall of what is typically portrayed in national media. I think we are weary from (and wary about) the angles being propped up, which might not be entirely representative of the day-to-day, on-the-ground story. Maybe you, too, want to read more personal, intimate stories like the one BYU published. If you are, it makes me hopeful. And it drives my writing.

Every day, I field messages sent from readers of my posts on my social media platforms (Instagram, FB, Twitter), who thank me for pulling back the curtain to an otherwise shrouded reality for them. I might grow obnoxious, posting every day (and sometimes more than once a day) on the stories that are changing my own life story. But you’re not hearing me apologize. These stories must be told.

The volunteers with whom I work know that the “refugee crisis” is a distinctly human and personal saga. It’s the story of Ahmad, Amina, Aeham, Mohammad, Ehsan, Akbar, Nada, Yalda, Fatema, Elias, Maiwand, Mahida. It’s the tragic/heroic tale of fathers and daughters, mothers and sons, engineering students and artisans, concert pianists and cobblers, farmers, physicians, Yazidis, Muslims, and yes, some Christians.

We know that, if history is told only in the abstract — with euphemisms, sterile headlines, and nameless numbers — then we will remain insulated. Unmoved like that, we will not engage. Unengaged, everyone loses.

All this is the impetus behind our non-profit, Their Story is Our Story: Giving Voice to Refugees (or TSOS). Led by my friend Trisha Leimer, and driven by Twila Bird, Elizabeth Benson Thayer, Lindsay Allen Silsby, Garret and Morgan Gibbons and myself, TSOS is busy at work, documenting the stories of the distressed, displaced, and often disoriented. We’ve been in camps in Greece. We’ve gathered in shelters in Germany. We’ve sat in parks and eaten kebabs and walked through forests, filmed hours and hours of footage, taken thousands of photographs, completed sketches and paintings, bent into one another’s arms in shared tears and are writing the stories. We hope you’ll follow our growth, await each story as we complete and share them, and learn along with us.

Final note: If you have specific questions you would like to ask regarding our non-profit, or the nature of refugee relief in general, or perhaps the journey of a refugee, please feel free to ask them here. If I can’t answer them, I have a global circle of informed volunteers, as well as an ever-growing community of refugee friends. They might be willing to write guests posts in response to your questions.

3 thoughts on “Strangers No More: BYU Magazine Article on Refugees in Germany

  1. Thank your for your incredible service and your willingness to share your experiences. I was so proud of a fellow BYU alumnus making a difference in the world, and emotionally touched when I read the article in the magazine. You reminded me of the words we heard recently in conference – to do what we can – and so with another nudge, it got me to do a little more within my own city, Seattle. In my city, we see people from all walks of life and they all have a story, as as you so eloquently state; we must never forget we are all children of our Heavenly Father and support each other in our life’s journey.

  2. I was touched and inspired by your article. I am also a BYU alumna (English/French, 1988) interested in reaching out to refugees. I live and teach in Sacramento, California, where more than 3,000 refugees resettled last year. I’m hoping to take a sabbatical in fall 2017 to learn more about how Europeans are integrating refugees into higher education. I’m planning to visit Norway, Sweden, Germany, and possibly Denmark and England. I would love to connect with the work you’re doing in Germany. Please let me know how to find out more.

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