Resisting Despair and Stoking Hope After US Presidential Elections

Months of blog silence means I’ve either been very busy with family and refugee work (yes), moving again (move #20!), ill (the US presidential race), or there’s been a natural disaster (the US president-elect.)

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Getty Images © Business Insider

Because I respect differences of opinions (however high pitched they might become in our expression of them), I wanted to insert mine into the global conversation.

Which is unusual – even unprecedented – for me. Over all my years of writing and speaking publicly, I’ve avoided dipping into the political. But I don’t want that silence to be wrongly ascribed to fear, self-preservation, neutrality, lack of interest or lack of knowledge. Politics matter to me, especially my political rights and responsibilities. One of those responsibilities is to plumb the strengths and the weaknesses of the US system by learning from other systems. In every culture in which we have lived, I have learned from others’ philosophies. I’ve also had chances to defend US policies and politics  when they’ve been misrepresented or misunderstood.

With the election of Mr. Trump, however, I’ve hit something I just cannot explain to anyone, even myself. All these years of learning to “see ourselves as other see us” (Robert Burns), and now I am mortified at what I see others see in us. Granted, I have reason to be hypersensitive to our foreign policies our foreign image, which are reflected to the rest of the world not in our Secretary of State (as some people mistakenly claim), but in our Commander in Chief.

What will his presidency – his cabinet choices, his policies, his conflicts of interest, his Twitter tick, his phone calls – mean nationally and internationally? History is watching. That is one reason of many behind why I wanted to write this piece. My rights and responsibilities of citizenship won’t let me sit quietly or recline into indifference.

So share this Inspirelle Feature Article. Leave a comment here (or on the webmag itself), even if that’s just a word or two. And of course speak up, even if — especially if — you and I don’t agree.

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© Melissa Dalton-Bradford and melissadaltonbradford.wordpress.com, 2017.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. . . which means, as long you’re not selling it, you’re welcome to share, but please remember to give me a link and mention my name.